Tagged: operation smile

A grandmother’s wish

I met Bao Zoma, mother of four and grandmother of seven, while taking a bike ride through the countryside of Madagascar. In September 2015, I joined Bao Zoma as she traveled to the Operation Smile medical mission in Tana with her middle grandchild, Sandra, who was in need of a cleft lip repair. Now that Sandra has a beautiful smile, Bao Zoma is motivated to find more children in need of critical surgical care and bring them to Operation Smile. She has become a spokesperson for Operation Smile in the part of her country where radios do not reach and many cannot read the posters that are taped up at the health huts around the village.

When asked what motivates her to find more children suffering from cleft lip and cleft palate, she responded: “My grandchild once suffered from cleft lip. My grandchild Sandra was teased, dropped out of school, and was a shy girl. Now I can’t keep her in the house, she has many friends, and is constantly smiling. She is beautiful. I would like to give that gift, the gift of smiling to others like Sandra.”

Bao Zoma recently recruited two other patients for the upcoming medical mission here in Madagascar in April.

I would like to give that gift, the gift of smiling to others like Sandra.

She walked eight kilometers, crossed a river and hiked another two kilometers to reach these children– a young boy by the name of Gino and a young girl named Nordine. I am happy to report they will be joining me on the medical mission in April.

Thank you Bao Zoma, not only for serving as a spokesperson for Operation Smile, but also for being an amazing grandmother.

Check out my story on Operation Smile’s Blog:  A grandmother’s wish

 

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Her smile changed.

This is Landrycia.

A couple months ago her grandmother reached out to me having heard that I brought children to an Operation Smile mission in Tana. I greeted her and her grandchild and explained that I would not be able to attend the mission held in Tamatave yet if she was prepared to travel on her own I would ensure that she would make it safely and be housed. I coordinated with the Catholic Church in Tamatave and paid this woman and her grandchildren fare up to the city.

Two months passed by and no sign of her or her grandchild. With no cell phone it was impossible to reach out to her. I didn’t know if she made it safe. I didn’t know whether her grandchild had been a candidate for surgery ( suffering from cleft lip).

At 8 months she looked tiny, thin, weak, and tired. Her mother had a difficult time breast feeding her because of the cleft lip and had been ostracized by members of her village for not properly caring for her child, thus leaving the child in the care of the grandmother.

Today, a young girl ( the one in the photograph showed up at my house. I responded “Akory!” (Hello!”) my mind turned she looked familiar. Then a few seconds later her grandmother came around the corner, “charlotteeyy! Efa sitrana Landrycia!” The grandmother yelled ” she is healed!” I stared in awe. This young girl was no longer weak, no longer thin, no longer without hope. She stood in front of me with beautiful big round eyes, healthy as can be barely a scar in sight.

Thank you Operation Smile.

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